Saturday, May 14, 2011

Sounds of Aloha with Frank DeLima

Today my husband is performing with the Sounds of Aloha in their annual show, Laughter and a Barbershop Song.   I have no idea what is the "plot", but hubby stuffed several props in his bag:  a stripped "prisoner" costume, giant size needle, and 4 leis.

Plus Hawaii's own Frank DeLima is the Master of Ceremony.   I invited Frank for a quick interview before he tended to his comedic duties.   From his bio

Frank De Lima is one of Hawaii's most popular and beloved comedians. For more than 30 years, this award-winning comic has been entertaining local residents and tourists alike with his zany parodies, outrageous sense of humor, and spontaneous creativity. Frank's specialty is translating issues - such as current events, fads, attitudes, and people - into fresh musical parodies.

Comedy has been ingrained in Frank's life since childhood. While growing up in Pauoa Valley on the Island of Oahu, Frank realized that he had a natural talent for making family and friends smile, especially at themselves.

"The ability to draw laughter or a smile is one of the greatest gifts you can give to people," states the proclaimed Portuguese Prince of Hawaiian Comedy. "Laughter makes a happy heart."

Frank personifies Hawaii's diverse ethnicities and cultures. His ethnic background, which is self-described as "veritable Portuguese Soup" and "Chop Suey Nation," consists of Portuguese, Hawaiian, Irish, Chinese, English, Spanish, and Scottish. He celebrates, not disregards, ethnic differences and integrates them into his comedic routines.

"Humor breaks down barriers and being able to laugh at oneself is the first step down that road," Frank explains.

Kim  Tell us about the Pauoa Valley - what is quirky and/or funny about it?

Frank:  Pauoa Valley is a small friendly middle class neighborhood a few minutes from downtown Honolulu. It is a microcosm of Hawaii with families of many ethnic backgrounds. Growing up there was an enriching learning experience in the appreciation of the cultures of the Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, Hawaiians and others. Each culture has so much to offer in terms of traditions, foods, customs, art, music and festivities. I learned so much in Pauoa.

Kim:  What inspired your parodies for the Cab Company?  Do Hawaiians laugh at themselves when their stereotypes appear in commercials?

Frank:  Tutu" is the affectionate Hawaiian term for "grandma." So, when asked to do a commercial that would emphasize the phone number of a cab company - 422-2222, the wordplay on the numbers was a natural. My portrayals of Hawaiian grandmas are meant to be fun and friendly.

Kim:  Since you are the self described "veritable Portuguese Soup", what's up with the Portuguese "guitar" being called the "jumping flee"? Do you use this Hawaiian staple in your comedy routine?

Frank:  You are referring to the ukulele which in Hawaiian literally means "jumping flea." I believe the term comes from descriptions of early players of the instrument whose fingers moved so quickly they were like fleas jumping. It was adopted from a small guitar-like instrument introduced to Hawaii by the Portuguese. I sometimes play one when I perform.

Kim:  Based your interaction with the following, what do tourists think is the funniest part of Hawaii?

Frank:  I hope tourists find local folks to be warm and welcoming people who enjoy laughter and the company of others and who are gracious with their visitors. People who are happy enjoy humor in healthy and wholesome ways. Tourists can be funny just as all people can be funny. Whenever people come together in harmony, friendship, appreciation and sharing there is bound to be enjoyment and laughter.

Kim;  What's in Frank DeLima's future? 

Frank:  I hope to keep making people laugh until a ripe old age.

Mahalo, Frank, for joining us at SOS Aloha!  I look forward to meeting you in person at the Hawaii Theater tonight!

Check out Frank's website for his upcoming tour date on and off island.  In honor of  tonight's performance, I am giving away a CD from the Sounds of Aloha!  To enter the giveaway,

1.  Leave a comment about barbershop singing and song parodies.

2.  This giveaway is open to all readers.

3.  Comments are open through Saturday, May 21, 10 pm in Hawaii.   I'll announce the winner on Sunday, May 22.


Kim in Hawaii

Check out these YouTube Videos with Frank's creations:

- The Cab Company/The Tutus (Islandwide)

- The Cab Company/The Tutus (Chattanooga Choo Choo)

- Tsunami Song

- Furlough Friday Song


  1. I think the Filipino Christmas song is the best parody ever!!! I listen to it all the time because it cracks me up!

  2. I used to love listening to Weird Al's parodies of 80's songs when I was young. Alot of the time, I liked his song better than the original.

  3. June M, I was the same. I hated Nirvania but loved his parody of Smells like Teen Spirit. I remember singing along with his "EAt it" and Madonna Parody.

  4. I've never watched his shows but still i love song parodies :) one of our local group singers always make song parodies. that make them famous !

  5. I'm a big Weird Al fan and have been since I was in college about 25 years ago.
    I can't believe your husband performed this week-end. That's is so great! My dear old hubby couldn't carry a tune in a bucket if his life depended on it!

  6. Is nobody else concerned or offended that such a wonderful song is completely butchered here? It's one thing to do parodies of current or recent hit songs, but to take a classic like this and turn it into a gross cheap drag queen commercial is just such a shame.

  7. ... talking about The Cab commercial that features a hideously gross parody of Chattanooga Choo Choo. Come on, why would anyone do that? I'm really hoping whoever owns the rights to that song sues The Cab for this.. vomit.