Monday, November 25, 2013

Aloha to Amanda Forester and A MIDSUMMER BRIDE

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On this day in 1778, Captain Cook came ashore to Maui, making him the first European to visit the Valley Isle.   Cook's accomplishments in the Pacific set the bar high for the Royal Navy during the Georgian Era.  Unfortunately, the Royal Navy would set the bar low during the Regency Era with "press gangs".  Amanda Forester joins us today with a special post about "press gangs" in her new release, A MIDSUMMER BRIDE, Book Two in the Marriage Mart series ...

Ka'anapali, Maui

Harriet Redgrave is an unconventional heroine for an English Regency romance – she's not even English! I got the idea for Midsummer Bride after I learned that during the Napoleonic Wars, the Royal Navy routinely turned to impressments, the taking of sailors by force to serve in the navy, in order to man their 600 ship fleet. Press gangs could operate both on land and at sea. By British law, any officer of the Royal Navy could, if the need arose, stop another seagoing vessel and press eligible men into service of the navy.

I was astounded to learn that the British navy could stop another ship and impress the English sailors into service. Could you imagine if the navy did that today? Early in the 19th century, British frigates often stationed themselves outside U.S. harbors in order to search American vessels for contraband or men they considered eligible for impressments. Since Britain did not recognize American naturalized citizenship, they considered anyone of British descent to be fair game for impressments. Obviously, Americans were none too pleased about this practice, and it became one of the reasons America declared war on Britain during the war of 1812.

I wondered what would happen if an American heiress, and granddaughter to a British earl, were on a ship seized by the Royal Navy. I enjoy stories that throw people out of their element to experience a completely different life. Harriet is taken, most unwillingly, to England where her aristocratic grandfather hires a matchmaker to find her a titled husband. Through her eyes, I was able to experience Regency society from the perspective of an outsider. As an author I had a lot of fun with Harriet running amuck in polite (and not so polite) English society. Add a handsome Scottish earl and a few nefarious French spies and you have a recipe for romance!

A Midsummer Bride is the second book in the Marriage Mart Series. Miss Harriet Redgrave, a horrendously rich American heiress, laughs too loud, states her opinion directly, and even conducts science experiments. Her aristocratic grandfather is desperate to get her respectably wed and is offering a king's ransom to anyone able to arrange a suitable marriage that comes with a title. In contrast, Harriet is interested in science and avoiding matrimony – until she meets Duncan Maclachlan, Earl of Thornton. Thornton has sworn to never marry for money, but is drawn to the irrepressible Harriet. What begins as friendship, and a desire to prevent his castle from being destroyed by some chemistry experiments gone wrong, sparks into a reaction that threatens to consume them both.

Often it is the hero who is cast as the outsider in romance stories, but do you also enjoy the heroine as the outsider? Comment for a chance to win a copy of A Midsummer Bride!

Thanks so much for inviting me. I hope a little A Midsummer Bride will warm your hearts this holiday season! I love to hear from readers so come visit me at my website, Facebook, or Twitter.


File:Caricature-1780-press gang.jpg
1780 caricature of a press gang
Public Domain (link)

Mahalo, Amanda, for joining us today.   Sourcebooks is giving away a print copy of A MIDSUMMER BRIDE to one randomly selected commenter.  To enter the giveaway,

1.  Leave a comment about science - do you find it intriguing?  I struggled with high school chemistry but enjoyed Physics! 

2.  This giveaway is open to readers in the US and Canada.

3.  Comments are open through Saturday, November 30, 10 pm in Hawaii.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, December 1.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City

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21 comments:

  1. Never was one for science. Never took Chemistry since it was not mandatory.

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  2. I quite liked Science when I was at school. This book sounds great of Amanda's.

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  3. I actually love science especially when I can relate it to real life - didn't like it so much in school - I think that was either the way it was taught (a lot of memorization) or the teachers (they didn't make it very interesting very often) - but now I love to watch the Discovery channel

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  4. As an adult, I do find science intriguing. Couldn't stand it in school!

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  5. I love the idea of science and the wonderful things it brings about but aside from biology, science was my doom in school!

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  6. I loved chemistry in high school. I even took the the golden state exam for that course, which you were invited to take. I even got recognition award for it. My favorite part was breaking down molecules in equations.

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  7. I think science is great!! I've always loved chemistry and how fun it is to mix things up

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  8. I love science. that is why I teach it.

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  9. I had three years of science in high school....I have to admit that those were some of my favorite classes

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  10. I found chemistry difficult but biology was much easier.

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  11. Though I loved Science in High School, I could not keep up and got my 1st and only 'D'. In my senior year, I found out my eyesight had worsened and was put in a remedial reading class and did vision exercises with my eye doctor. In my freshman year at college, I signed up for Earth History (volcano and earthquake science) and got an 'A'! Did I also mention I am an original Star Trek TV follower? I loved meeting the author once, and cannot wait to read more of her work.
    Nancy Lee Badger
    www.nancyleebadger.blogspot.com

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  12. Thank you for the giveaway. I'd love to read the book. I'm sorry to say but science is over my head, lol.

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  13. First, I'll answer Amanda's question. Yes, I enjoy it when both the hero and heroine are cast outsiders.

    Kim, I am sorry to say that science is way beyond my head. This book sounds wonderful and fun. Thanks for the giveaway!

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  14. not a big science fan but I love science fiction?! LOL... not the same thing I know but still! I love unconventional heroines, especially in HR. another author that has science centered heroines is Heather Snow. Thanks for sharing!

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  15. Yes, I do enjoy science. My hubby reads physics books for fun and we have the Science Channel on the tv a lot. Some of it is pretty interesting.

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  16. I've always loved science, astrophysics being my favorite.

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  17. Fascinating post about press gangs. I love the sound of Harriet being a 'fish out of water.'

    I always loved science and did well. Could be why I went on to become a nurse.

    Marcy Shuler
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  18. I'm always in awe of people who are scientists or even just understand that sort of thing. Science is not my strong point and I admire those who are good at it.

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  19. I liked science, but stuggled with math which in turn makes science more difficult. But I enjoy reading about scientifiic discoveries, etc.

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  20. not really interested

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