Monday, April 20, 2015

Aloha to Collette Cameron and WAGERS GONE AWRY


What Inspires My Romance Novel Ideas? What doesn’t? 
By Collette Cameron 


Thank you so much for having me back on SOS Aloha, Kim. I need a sunny destination to hang out with all the rain we have in Oregon in April.

I often get asked what inspires me to write my romances. I think that’s true of all authors. I usually search for something pithy and wise sounding.

And come up empty-handed.

I’ve got three books releasing back-to-back, and each one was written for entirely different reasons.

Wagers Gone Awry (Conundrums of the Misses Culpepper) was intended as a sweet, light, easy Regency read, and the original title didn’t have anything about wagers in it. But then, on the cusp of planting my rear in a chair to start writing it, my husband told me about the struggles a close friend of ours is having with a gambling addictions.

The next thing know, I’m quoting, Wisdom and Advice—The Genteel Lady’s Guide to Practical Living, a fictionalized guide that is mentioned throughout the story.

“As is oft the case when wagering, one party is a fool and the other a thief, although both may bear the title nincompoop.”

During the Regency Era, gambling was a popular and acceptable form of entertainment, which resulted in the financial ruination of many a man and woman. Heath and Brooke learn first-hand the hardships and chaos one person’s careless gambling can cause for others.

Bride of Falcon, a Regency Novella (May 4, 1015) was birthed as a result of the Wimpleton’s ball scene in Triumph and Treasure. I introduced a couple of characters at that ball that I wanted to have their own stories, and A Kiss for Miss Kingsley was the result.

Once my imagination got hold of the idea, though, there was no stopping my mind from formulating some additional fated matches at the ball, and Bride of Falcon came along. Ivonne and Chance are reunited after a three-year separation. There’s is a hard-won happily ever after.

You’re the first to know, but I’m working on a third novella set at the Wimpleton’s ball too. Shhh.

Finally, Heart of a Highlander, a Scottish short story (May 26th), came about when I was asked to write a short story for an anthology. I adored Hugh and Giselle Ferguson since I first introduced them as secondary characters in Highlander’s Hope.

I cut a scene in Highlander’s Hope where Ewan told Yvette how his mother and Hugh met and married. Heart of a Highlander tells the entire tale, and it’s filled with Scottish folklore too.

So you see, just about anything will get my mind weaving another story. It’s actually becoming a bit of a pain, since I cannot possibly write as fast as I get ideas.

Do you like getting a chance to peek a bit more into secondary characters lives? What about when historicals dig into some of the social issues of the era? Does that ruin the escapism and the enjoyment of the story for you?

I’d love to connect with you!

collettecameron.com
twitter.com/Collette_Author
facebook.com/collettecameronauthor

Newsletter link

Wagers Gone Awry Buy Links

Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Kobo

Bride of Falcon Pre-order Links

Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
iBooks 

Heart of a Highlander Buy Links

Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
iBooks 


Mahalo, Collette, for introducing us to WAGERS GONE AWRY.  I am giving away a book choice from my convention stash to one randomly selected commenter.  To enter the giveaway,

1.  Answer Collette's questions, 

Do you like getting a chance to peek a bit more into secondary characters lives? What about when historicals dig into some of the social issues of the era? Does that ruin the escapism and the enjoyment of the story for you? 

2.  Comments are open through Saturday, April 25, 10 pm in Baltimore.  

3.  I'll post the winner on Sunday, April 26.

Mahalo,

Kim in Baltimore
Aloha Spirit in Charm City

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40 comments:

  1. I always appreciate stories about secondary characters. We get to know and like them and it is nice to get to know them better.
    As for getting into social issues, I am all for it. Reading, even romance, isn't just for escapism for me. I read historicals partly to learn more about the time period in which the stories are set. Of course, I look for books that are well researched and as accurate as possible.
    Best wishes for the success of your books.

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    1. I love secondary characters! They make for some interesting reading. One of the reason I write historicals is because I like learning about the past too.

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  2. I do enjoy reading about secondary characters and getting to know them better than just having them show up for a couple of scenes. It doesn't ruin the escapism for me when stories delve deeper into the social issues of the era.

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    1. I don't mind social issues of the era, but I have a hard time when writers bring today's social issues into a historical. It doesn't always work well and feels forced to me.

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  3. It's such a treat to be here again, Kim.

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  4. The social issues of any time period enhance the reading enjoyment. I find I immerse myself more rather than the reverse.

    Secondary characters are very important. They can add so much to the story.

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    1. You're absolutely right, Mary. So good to see you here!

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  5. If the social issues don't overshadow the romance it's ok with me & I love secondary characters, they add depth to the story. Maje it more 3D :)

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    1. I really enjoy quirky secondary characters, but then I have a quirky sense of humor too.

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  6. I love secondary characters!!! I also enjoy learning a little about the social issues of the times as it impacts the characters and storyline. Thanks!

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    1. You're welcome. It's interesting the things I'll uncover during research that I had no idea were an issue.

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  7. I love reading about lives that touched main characters. I think bringing in social issues is amazing. It was part of life back then.

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    1. Exactly, Debby. It makes the story more authentic.

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  8. I enjoy reading about secondary characters, and hope that they will get to tell their own story in a future book. Talking about social issues of the times is fine by me.

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    1. A lot of my secondary characters demand their own stories!

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  9. Yes I do love reading about secondary characters if their story doesn't overshadow the main characters story.

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    1. Good point, Danielle. The focus needs to be on the main characters and the secondary ones enhance the story. I even use animals as characters.

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  10. fun to see more on secondary characters--they help round out a story. as long as it is period appropriate, I don't mind the social causes highlighted.

    Denise

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    1. Denise, I'm with you. If the social issue is accurate to the period, I like seeing it interspersed lightly throughout the story. I've seen 21st century issues in historicals and in my opinion, it detracts from the story's authenticity.

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  11. I enjoy both. I not only read for escapism but to learn also. I was just told I know a little bit of everything which I take as a great compliment - I got it all from reading.

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    1. I love that! I'm full of random trivia and facts and when people ask me how I know stuff, I tell them I read a lot. And now, research a lot!

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  12. Yes, I do enjoy secondary characters. They add a fun element to the story. And I love reading about the social issues of the era. I like to be transported back to that time and one way to really do that is to include what society was dealing with back then.

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    1. It makes the reading more realistic, doesn't it Linda?

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    1. Karen, your reply reminds me of a line Heath says in Wagers Gone Awry.

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  14. Secondary characters make the story more real. Sometime they even steal the show! Similarly on the social issues. I'm impressed when authors add that to a story & yet keep the romance in the forefront

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    1. Exactly, Linda. For a romance, I think that's critical. Not so much for just historical fiction.

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  15. I love getting to see more into the lives of secondary characters. You never know when they will have their own story.

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    1. I was just working a story today, and I like one of the secondary characters so much, I'm already trying to figure out how she can have her own story.

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  16. Secondary characters add so much to a story, they can help show different sides to the main characters. And I love when they get their own story in a series! I do like to learn about how people actually loved in their times - it can show us how far we've come (or not).

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  17. Yes. Yes. And. No.

    The secondary characters and current events help fill out a story and make it so much more interesting. It is hard to escape into a story if it is not at all believable or interesting.

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  18. I love hearing about secondary characters lives and usually wish they get their own book.
    patoct

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  19. doesn't matter to me

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  20. I really enjoy when historicals delve into the issues of the time. It makes the story seem more real to me.

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  21. I love reading about secondary characters and issues of the time.

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  22. If it's written well, I can go along with politics and social situations outside of the H/h. I LOVE secondary characters as well. They bring a different side of the story to light in my opinion. :)

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  23. I adore secondary characters! As long as it flows with the plot and isn't extreme/hard to follow/brings you out of the story I'm okay with political situations.

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  24. I absolutely love secondary characters. If they interest me enuf, I hope they will get their own book.
    gmapeony

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